0845 474 4572
info@eurospanbookstore.com

In stock: Usually despatched within 24hrs

New Deal/New South

An Anthony J. Badger Reader

Anthony J. Badger (author) James C. Cobb (foreword)

ISBN: 9781557288448

Publication Date: Jan 2008

Format: Paperback

Also available as: Hardback  

Contains twelve essays that examine how white liberal southern politicians who came to prominence in the New Deal and World War II handled the race issue when it became central to politics in the 1950s and 1960s. This book states that it was the southern business leaders and New South politicians who mediated the transition to desegregation.
£19.95

In stock: ships within 24hrs

  • Full Description
  • More Information
  • Author Biography
  • Customer Reviews
The twelve essays in this book, some published for the first time, represent some of Tony Badger's best work in his ongoing examination of how white liberal southern politicians who came to prominence in the New Deal and World War II handled the race issue when it became central to politics in the 1950s and 1960s. Franklin Roosevelt in the 1930s thought a new generation of southerners would wrestle Congress back from the conservatives. Political scientists such as V. O. Key Jr. thought the collapse of segregation would herald a new liberal class in the South. The Supreme Court thought that responsible southern leaders would lead their communities to general school desegregation after the Brown decision. John F. Kennedy believed that moderate southern leaders would, with government support, facilitate peaceful racial change. Badger's writings demonstrate how all of these hopes were misplaced. Badger shows that time and time again that moderates did not control southern politics. Southern liberal politicians for the most part were paralyzed by their fear that ordinary southerners were all-too-aroused by the threat of integration and were reluctant to offer a coherent alternative to the conservative strategy of resistance. Indeed, liberal politicians became irrelevant in the 1960s as African Americans and the federal government dictated the timetable of racial change. It was southern business leaders and a new generation of New South politicians who mediated the transition to desegregation.
Illustrations index
Pages 320
Date Published 30 Jan 2008
Publisher The University of Arkansas Press
Subject/s Social discrimination   Political leaders & leadership   Liberalism & centre democratic ideologies  
ANTHONY J. BADGER is Paul Mellon Professor of American History at Cambridge University and Master of Clare College. He is the author of a number of books, including North Carolina and the New Deal; The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940; The Making of Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement (with Brian Ward); and Contesting Democracy (with Byron Shafer). James Cobb is the B. Phinizy Spalding Distinguished Professor at the University of Georgia. His most recent book is Away Down South: A History of Southern Identity.

Write Your Own Review

Only registered users can write reviews. Please, log in or register

Post your comment

Eurospan Bookstore