0845 474 4572
info@eurospanbookstore.com

In stock: Usually despatched within 24hrs

The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire

Bartholomew H. Sparrow (author)

ISBN: 9780700614820

Publication Date: Sep 2006

Format: Paperback

Also available as: Hardback  

When the US took control of Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Guam following the Spanish-American War, it was unclear to what degree these islands were actually part of the US. By looking at what became known as the Insular Cases, this work reveals how America resolved to govern these territories.
£19.50

In stock: ships within 24hrs

  • Full Description
  • More Information
  • Author Biography
  • Customer Reviews
When the United States took control of Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Guam following the Spanish-American War, it was unclear to what degree these islands were actually part of the U.S. and, in particular, whether the Constitution applied fully, or even in part, to their citizens. By looking closely at what became known as the Insular Cases, Bartholomew Sparrow reveals how America resolved to govern these territories. Sparrow follows the Insular Cases from the controversial Downes v. Bidwell in 1901, which concerned tariffs on oranges shipped to New York from Puerto Rico and which introduced the distinction between incorporated and unincorporated territories, to Balzac v. Puerto Rico in 1922, in which the Court decided that Puerto Ricans, although officially U.S. citizens, could be denied trial by jury because Puerto Rico was "unincorporated." There were 35 Insular Cases in all, cases stretching across two decades, cases in which the Court ruled on matters as diverse as tariffs, double jeopardy, and the very meaning of U.S. citizenship as it applied to the inhabitants of the offshore territories. Providing a new look at the history and politics of U.S. expansion at the turn of the twentieth century, Sparrow's book also examines the effect the Court's decisions had on the creation of an American empire. It highlights crucial features surrounding the cases - the influence of racism on the justices, the need for naval stations to protect new international trade, and dramatic changes in tariff policy. It also tells how the Court sanctioned the emergence of two kinds of American empire: formal territories whose inhabitants could be U.S. citizens but still be denied full political rights, and an informal empire based on trade, cooperative foreign governments, and U.S. military bases rather than on territorial acquisitions. "The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire" reveals how the United States handled its first major episode of globalization and how the Supreme Court, in these cases, crucially redirected the course of American history.
Bartholomew H. Sparrow is associate professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin. His previous books include From the Outside In: World War II and the American State.

Write Your Own Review

Only registered users can write reviews. Please, log in or register

Post your comment

Eurospan Bookstore